Tag Archives: @clarkmike

Keep it simple Make it beautiful Have fun – sharing through @HaikuDeck

A year on from when @paulbromford published a Haiku Deck celebrating #60yearsoflearning and this October in a special birthday edition I invited some of the people I admire to share their secrets of being social online.

 

Paul and I are very aware of how important it is to share knowledge and information especially for people new to social media. Whilst we have not quite been able to achieve our aim of creating one new presentation a month throughout 2014 we hope the following Haiku Decks will give you ideas for different ways of presenting your thoughts and ideas.

January 2014

February 2014

March 2014

April 2014

May 2014

We are taking a summer break because we have both been busy with #powerplayers14 and Paul has been busy with the Bromford Lab. He has produced a series of Haiku Decks to explain the purpose of the Lab, launch a recruitment campaign through Twitter and encouraging people to get involved.

 

Paul initially inspired me to explore the potential of Haiku Deck with the following presentation which has now had an impressive 90,000 views.

If you are thinking of starting a blog these top tips from  will hopefully inspire you!

Useful guidance from Paul about developing your own personal social media policy

Hot tip – add your Haiku Deck on slideshare and you will reach an even bigger audience!

 

Digital Leadership – 10 top tips from @clarkmike

twitter at smwldnIs a ‘digital’ leader any different from a ‘traditional’ leader? Following on from top ten tips on social media http://bit.ly/16v9eGf, Mike Clark suggests some of the likely characteristics of digital leaders.

1 You don’t have to be a techie

Digital leaders do not have to be experts on tech detail, but need to understand how to exploit it to make connections and achieve good outcomes that make a difference

2 You don’t need an organisation

Digital leaders don’t always have organisations, budgets or staff – they don’t need structure charts – they may have more connections and followers outside of their own organisations

3 Its 24/7/365 and chaotic

Digital leaders operate in a 24/7/365 disrupted & chaotic world not cosy hierarchies, clubs and niches – they build new connections & collaborations at speed – they may be on their own but they communicate extensively

4 You listen more to people with opposing views

Digital leaders seek out people with different views and perspectives to understand how barriers can be overcome – they have wide reach, they question and challenge, summarise and synthesise, simplify and de-clutter when necessary

5 Restrict social media access and you may lose your followers

If organisational managers restrict social media access in work hours, staff will find digital leaders out of hours operating 24/7/365 in open, accessible environments. Equally, giving staff access to social media is unlikely to turn around a poorly led organisation

6 Inspire in 140 characters & trust your staff

If as a leader you are not able to summarise your vision in simple terms in 140 characters, someone else on social media will probably be the inspiration for your staff. Sadly, staff are often forced to leave their digital skills at the office door – digital leaders help nurture and develop those skills

7 Be courageous

It takes courageous leaders to allow their own hierarchies to be disrupted – digital leaders can build external followers before looking at how they can develop & engage their own organisations. Digital leadership is not the role of the Comms Team

8 Use multiple platforms to source ideas and communicate success 

Digital leaders use social media on multiple platforms as a test bed for their ideas and innovations – crowdsourcing, cajoling, capturing and continuously looking for and communicating small wins

9 Think real time, not part time

Digital leaders acknowledge sources, build trust and show appreciation in real time using multiple platforms that work for their connections and followers who appreciate the recognition of their contributions

10 Review and dismantle barriers

Digital leaders review and dismantle traditional infrastructures that act as barriers to innovation or which do not add value – they support and champion people that are close to service users and customers – they help people unlearn bad habits & some non-digital skills that impede progress

Mike Clark has worked as an independent consultant in health and social care since 1992. You can currently find him reporting on telehealth, telemedicine, telecare, digital and mHeath as well as UK health and social care for www.telecarelin.org.ukhttps://www.rebelmouse.com/clarkmike/ or Google at ‘Mike Clark Telecare’