Category Archives: Disruptive Social Care

Is fragmented information a barrier to #connectedcare? guest post from @PaulBromford

One of the important issues identified ahead of Connected Care Camp is that people struggle to find information, advice and support about care services both online and offline.

Certainly the web is much more complex than it was a few years ago and the Care “marketplace” is an increasingly crowded space that many find difficult to negotiate.

One of the Breakout sessions at #psicare discussed this problem and attempted to come up with some solutions.

Our initial look at the problem revealed the following:

There’s no a lack of information – Searching “advice for carers” gives about  16,400,000 results search results.  But identifying trusted sources is an issue.

  • Many people only look for information once they are at a point of crisis – which confuses the issue further as people frantically search for an immediate solution.
  • People have difficulty identifying what a great care service looks like. There’s a need to share lessons from care successes and failures. In England the Care Quality Commission have an important role in sharing information.

So here are five possible solutions we came up with:

Make space for difficult conversations

The group accepted that making social care “sexy” is a challenge.  We live is a society obsessed with denying the effects of ageing. We keep hearing 50 is the new 30, 70 the new 50.

Although we agreed the need for a huge culture shift on attitudes towards ageing – we also accepted we had to be realistic around the outcomes of a 60-minute workshop!

Suggested Solution: A campaign of awareness for public and professionals to start having proactive conversations around longer-term care needs. The starting point to be establishing much better communication between health, housing and care. Housing in particular was thought to have a key role.

If every professional was equipped with the right skills, technology  and space to have a conversation – imagine how we could help people seeking care at the point of crisis?

Establish a principle of “The 5 Things I need to know”

In a free market the emergence of a “Tripadvisor” of Care might be wishful thinking.

But how about we establish the Top 5 things everyone should know to look for when they are looking at options? Available across care and related sectors including health and housing – this would also better support multi disciplinary specialists to give advice.

If it’s difficult to know what “good” really looks like let’s give people 5 things they should look for before anything else.

Map and connect locally available resources

The group felt that vital community hubs are underutilised as a way of enabling access to care information. There are scores of interest groups, informal community networks and clubs available in most localities that often exist under the radar of local authorities. Often run by volunteers they are the hidden networks where people seek informal advice and support from trusted advisors.

How can it be in 2013 that nobody can articulate how many of these actually exist? Surely technology – especially location based apps – can help us unlock this resource to help in the sharing of information and even to identify informal and potential carers.

Enable people in residential care to access digital tools

It remains a problem that many residential homes still do not have access to the most basic technology. Additionally most hospitals do not have publicly available WiFi – this is another barrier to stop people seeking out advice and support.

How can we expect and encourage people in residential care to suggest how their care can be improved when they are all too often excluded from the internet?

In a world where funding can go to all sorts of projects which struggle to articulate meaningful outcomes making digital technology available to the most socially excluded must be a priority.

Establish a more consistently understood and coherent way of care users engaging with services before, during and whilst receiving care services.

The group thought we were missing valuable insights from care givers and those receiving care about how they thought access to information and support could be improved.

It was felt there is no consistency for users in understanding when care services should be reviewed or appraised for instance

Linking to the “5 things you need to know about care” the group pondered how digital technology could help people comment on the service they receive and raise awareness of resources such as Patient Opinion, Care Opinion, NHS Choices and Your Care Home.  Perhaps a personalised digital care plan – complete with alerts for family and friends could be used to connect services in one place and sharing updates to innovations like Mindings

Quick Poll: Which organisation would you recommend to an older person seeking advice about care and support options?

One thing was very clear from our discussion:

We don’t need more information. We need better quality connected conversations.

 

 

 

 

Can digital technology help make connected care a reality? #psicare

There are six Breakout sessions at Connected Care Camp being held on Saturday 7th December. Below is a brief list of some of the many online resources available. Using technology and thanks to @clarkmike we now have a Connected Care Mindmap with lots of resources to inform our discussions at the event.  if you have a resource you would like to add to the Mindmap please tweet a link to the relevant URL using #psicare

Social Isolation, Loneliness and the impact on health and wellbeing

Joseph Rowntree Foundation #Loneliness Resource Pack
How can we ensure a good quality of life for adults in residential care and housing with support. This means having a sense of purpose and full inclusion within the community with strong social contacts and mental stimulation.

 “ Residents reported being able to look at websites to do with their interests and hobbies, use internet shopping sites and communicate with family members, often overseas. Some had already noted beneficial impact on their carer’s ability to help manage their condition.”

Get Connected programme Social Care Institute for Excellence

Examples of how digital technology in empowering and supporting the health and wellbeing of individuals.

Information, advice and support across the care, health and housing sectors.

Connected Communities

How digital technology is supporting individuals to connect in different ways and live more independent and fulfilling lives within the community.

One of the simplest needs is the ability to stay in touch with family and friends who may be widely dispersed. There are a range of online tools available to address the practical tasks of co-ordinating the care and support of an individual.

Virtual, online and microvolunteering provide different ways for people to contribute to their communities online

Digital Literacy, Inclusion and the Barriers to Technology Adoption
Accessing and learning about the digital world can be a challenge for many groups in the UK.  Getting started on the internet – a brief guide
The challenges of Integrated Care

User and patient engagement and the personalisation of services

How can technology world encourage more patient and user engagement? Are public services signposting people to the many online support forums now available?

Follow Connected Care Camp and join in the discussions on Twitter using the hashtag #psicare

#psicare Can online innovations enhance social care?

The simple answer for me is yes whilst I accept that digital technology is not a “magic bullet” I do believe it is important that we explore the potential of  technology to create more personal support and care.

As Professor Stephen Hawking said, when accepting his AbilityNet ‘Excellence in Accessibility Award’ at the Technology4Good awards: “Technology is a vital part of human existence. They show us that the right tools in the right hands can help everyone, regardless of our frailties, to achieve our true potential and advance as a civilisation.”

The posts I have written for Nominet Trust exploring the issues:

Can online innovations enhance social care?

How online personal support networks can promote more integrated care

Why digital inclusion is important for care home residents

How digital technology is supporting people living with dementia

Celebrate & learn from the world’s most inspiring social technology  ventures. Featuring the 2013 Nominet Trust 100

Enjoy!

Communicating differently – the value of social media #kidsorg13

This week I am running a social media workshop for Camden Special Parents Forum part of KIDS London which provides a wide range of direct support services for disabled children, young people and their families. KIDS’ vision is a world in which all disabled children and young people realise their aspirations and their right to an inclusive community which supports them and their families. @SpfCamden 

It is always interesting developing a presentation for an unknown audience some of whom may be very confident using social media and others yet to be convinced that it has any value in their day to day lives. There is just so much to share and a post can only provide a snapshot of all the resources available.

“Young people don’t see the risk of social media but older people don’t see the power” @nickkeane speaking at the European Conference on Social Media and Policing Lisbon. It is important that we keep people safe online but not make it so scary that the opportunities for engaging, sharing and learning are lost.

Twitter has been described by  Om Malik  as “the pulse of our planet, one that gives the internet a sense of humanity”

Digital technology and social networks provide some of the most powerful tools available today for building a sense of belonging, support and sharing. Over 30 million people in the UK are now using social media, Twitter is used by over 230 million people every month and 24 milllion Britons use Facebook every day.

The impact of digital technology on how we communicate, access services and find information has radically transformed how we conduct our everyday lives and our relationships with others. We can learn so much from each other. A request on Twitter for thoughts about the value of social media for carers produced this lovely response:

You may not guess this but I’m a big fan of social media. The ability to connect with people across the world, the diverse articles posted that one may not otherwise see and instant access to breaking news before any other medium make Twitter an incredibly valuable resource. Importantly social media enables individuals and small organisations to have a much bigger voice and be involved in the many online discussions which are informing and shaping the development of care services.

I am just one person running a small digital engagement consultancy with a few trusted associates and this is my digital footprint! It is worth exploring Twitter tools such as @RebelMouse and @vizify to enhance your social media presence.

Twitter @shirleyayres

LinkedIn: uk.linkein.com/in/shirleyayres

Blog: Connecting Social Care and Social Media

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/disruptivesocialcare

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DisruptiveSocialCare

RebelMouse my social front page: https://www.rebelmouse.com/shirleyayres

VizifyTwitter video : https://www.vizify.com/shirley-ayres/twitter-video

But connection isn’t about platforms or tools. It’s about people.

On Twitter you can connect with Norman Lamb Minister of State for Care and Support @normanlamb , Jon Rouse Director General for Social Care @RouseJonDGDH,  Andrea Sutcliffe Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care @Crouchendtiger7 and the Chief Executives of most charities working in the field of disability.

Information is freely shared through social media. For example Netbuddy encourages the swapping practical tips and information on all aspects of supporting people with learning disabilities @netbuddytoptips

 Enabled by Design is a community of people who are passionate about well-designed, everyday products that challenge the one-size-fits-all approach to assistive equipment. Enabled by Design encourages people to share their views and experiences of assistive equipment, share wish lists about improving products and services, and post information, reviews and comments. @enabledby

One of the simplest needs for people is the ability to stay in touch with family and friends who may be widely dispersed. There are a range of online tools available to maintain and strengthen connections and address the practical tasks of co-ordinating the care  of an individual. Personal support networks provide a safe, moderated online space which can connect family, friends and professionals providing formal and informal care. Examples include:  Tyze, Yecco, Rally-Round and My People and Places

Getting started on Twitter

I hope workshop participants will be excited by the potential offered by social media and I am looking forward to welcoming more people to the wonderful world of social media!

The Twitter Help centre provides useful guidance and Mashable have produced the Twitter Guide Book.

Useful tips to guide you in developing your own personal social media policy have been produced by Paul Taylor @paulbromford.  Thanks for sharing Paul!

I will be taking note of the questions and issues raised at #kidsorg13 and will add further resources after the workshop.

Welcome to the Connected Care Camp on 7th December 2013 #psicare

“The role for many public service organisations is to actively mainstream the innovation that is already out there. There are loads of innovators and entrepreneurs who just need a route to market. Some of them may already be employed by you.” Paul Taylor Innovation Coach Bromford speaking on the Disruptive Social Care podcast May 2013

Public Service Launchpad is a new programme to help passionate people who work either paid or unpaid in all kinds of public services – whether in local government, housing associations, health services, the third sector, social enterprises or elsewhere to develop ideas to solve the problems that they encounter every day. Ideas can involve small changes or radical redesign of services.

As part of the scholarship programme and to encourage wider participation across care the Connected Care Camp has been organised on Saturday 7th December from 10.00 – 4.30 in London.

We want to encourage front line staff, managers and people who use care services to come along and share experiences, wisdom and ideas about how we can improve care services.

Here are some of the problems we know about in the care sector

  • How can health and care services support people who are lonely and isolated – there’s a million of them
  • People struggle to find information, guidance and advice – how can we improve the systems?
  • How can we support more connected communities?
  • Are there any alternatives to the 15 minute care visits?
  • How could doctors, nurses, social workers and support staff better coordinate care planning and visits?
  • How can we support people with disabilities to live more independent and fulfilling lives?
  • Why don’t all hospitals and care homes have wi-fi and internet access?
  • How can we support staff, people who use care services, carers and volunteers to improve their digital skills and feel more confident using technology?
  • Why don’t care homes have video links to GPs and hospital doctors to avoid unnecessary visits and disruption?
  • How can digital technologies can give people more control of their care and support and make person centred care a reality?
  • How can  technology  help develop the local care market place?
  • How can digital technology  help to support carers & care networks?
  • How can technology  help to reduce unplanned or readmissions to hospitals and  ensure effective discharges?
  • There are particular challenges for people living in rural areas to access services & products . How can technology  help us to address the rural premium?

Do you have any great ideas about how we can fix these and the many challenges confronting the care sector?

Do use #psicare to join in the Twitter discussions before and during the day.

Connected Care Camp Programme 

9.30 – 10.00 Registration

10.00 – 10.15 Welcome

10.15 – 10.45 Introductions

10.45 – 11.15 What could community care and support look like in the 21st Century? A wish list (small group discussion)

11.15 – 11.30 Break

11.30 – 12.00 Feedback and Discussion

12.00 – 1.00 What do we need to start doing, what do we need to stop doing and  what do we need to carry on doing?

1.00 – 1.45 Lunch

1.45  – 2.45 Choice of themed  sessions exploring opportunities for innovation

  • Community Connections
  • Health and Wellbeing
  • Digital Inclusion
  • Residential Care and Housing with Support
  • Social Media workshop to develop confidence and share expertise about the use and potential of digital tools

2.45 – 3.45 Themed sessions repeated

3.45 – 4.15 Panel debate “Next Steps”

4.15 – 4.30 Closing Remarks

By the end of the day you will:

  • Have made at least 10 new contacts who are involved in the care, health,  housing and voluntary sectors
  • Shared emerging and good practice
  • Discussed and received feedback on your ideas
  • Learned about at least 20 current innovations across the care sector

It should be noted that the care sector is a complex and fragmented market and the adoption of new ideas is not easy and present many challenges.

A roundup of Connected Care Camp posts, resources and videos #psicare

the “elderly” what’s in a word?

https://twitter.com/bmc875/status/389307305151307776

https://twitter.com/bmc875/status/389309001105563648

Our latest Disruptive Social Care podcasts!

Praise indeed!

How to keep up to date with news. innovations and events in care – my online roladex system!

Such a great interview with Dominic Campbell inspirational founder of Future Gov that we did not want to edit it but decided to give it to you in two parts!

And because it was so good a reminder of our interview with Paul Taylor Innovation Coach at Bromford!

Saturday 31st Aug thoughts via Twitter

My recommended reading, viewing and thinking for the weekend!

https://twitter.com/shirleyayres/status/373703533926703104

https://twitter.com/shirleyayres/status/373705285296062464

https://twitter.com/ForSocialWork/status/373505899123314688